Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Green Commentary’

Kintigh_Generating_Station_-_Somerset,_New_YorkVortex Tools covers the Supreme Court’s ruling against the Environmental Protection Agency’s attempt to limit power plant emissions.

It’s been a spotlight year for the U.S. Supreme Court (SCOTUS). One week, a political group can claim SCOTUS is finally leading on an issue that is overdue for reform; the next week, the same group can gripe that the same SCOTUS shouldn’t overstep their bounds and should respect the laws as is. Yay, politics?

So this is the SCOTUS ruling this week:

The basics:

  • In 2011, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed new regulations on coal- and oil-fired power plant emissions. These rules—on curbing mercury and other hazardous air pollutants—were supposed to take place in April 2016 and included capturing 90% of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants (before they get released into the air), reducing 88% of acid gas emissions from power plants, and reducing sulfur dioxide emissions by 41%.
  • However, 21 states and industry groups challenged the regulations in front of the Supreme Court, and on June 29th, 2015, they voted 5-4 against the EPA. The main reasoning was that the EPA did not reasonably consider the costs of these regulations, and the majority of SCOTUS believes that the economic cost—costing $9.6 billion to install/operate equipment to remove mercury pollutants—disproportionately exceeded the health and environmental benefits.
  • The dissent believed that the EPA had considered these costs at the later stages of the project. They estimated that while the costs were nearly $10 billion for energy companies to get into compliance, they argued benefits of $37 to $90 billion annually. However, the majority of SCOTUS did not agree, and the EPA now returns to lower courts to account for the costs of compliance.

The interpretation:

  • Saying that the EPA overreached and didn’t consider the plausibility of enforcing such a standard is a common complaint from the industries looking at regulation. However, there are previous examples where this has not helped, like with cellulosic ethanol standards in gasoline—where the standards were unattainable, but the EPA enforced fines anyway.
  • Energy companies rarely like regulation, and as much as they say that they’ll regulate themselves, it rarely happens unless they’re forced into it, so some regulation is needed. Once regulations are enforced, innovation happens. However, this is not always the case (again, looking at ethanol standards in gasoline: lignocellulosic ethanol was supposed to be the great equalizer, but it wound up being a fantasy fuel that remains unproven, and the regulations remain unattainable).
  • This was the first of President Obama’s energy regulations to make it up to the Supreme Court, and with the ruling, it sets a precedence for the rest. Now state courts can point to a ruling from above them and this may well stop other energy cases from reaching the Supreme Court again. Regardless, as the regulations were announced at the end of 2011, some power plant companies already made an attempt to comply with the regulations.

However it goes, political groups will still have plenty to complain about next week.

*     *     *

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

Read Full Post »

China’s population is moving. As mentioned previously, an estimated quarter-million people a month move to Beijing. As the cities grow larger, old villages grow smaller, some of which are now abandoned.

With this in mind, photographer Tang Yuhong shows what happens when you ignore those sneaky plants for years:

abandoned2

According to Dangerous Minds, “(t)he village is located in the Shengsi Islands, near the mouth of the Yangtze River.”

abandoned1

abandoned3jpg

For more of this full-on foliage assault, see here.

*     *     *

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

Read Full Post »

Vortex Tools looks at the Toyota Mirai—one of the first commercially sold hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles. The Japanese car company’s latest video explores some of the more creative ways Toyota can run this fuel cell vehicle (FCV).

If you read the title, you know this one will be NSFW (due to language), but since warnings don’t really work well in snappy titles, sorry…

Anyway, this is the Toyota Mirai (“Mirai” means “future” in Japanese):

Toyota_mirai_trimmed

The Mirai was revealed in November 2014 and Toyota plans to build and sell 700 of them globally in 2015. The car will sell in the U.S. for about $60,000 and only in California at first. Japan already has subsidies in place, but at this stage, it is unclear what government incentives will help promote hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles in the States.

So how does it work?

Yes, the video is light on the extensive process of how they strip the hydrogen from manure then use it to fuel cars, but hey, it’s a three-minute marketing piece for the everyman.

On their site, Toyota even admits that this cow manure approach is more of an attention grabber (as part of their “Fueled By Everything” campaign) than a reliable, sustainable approach:

While cow manure contains plenty of hydrogen, it’s not commonly used in the U.S. to create the biogas needed for this process. Today’s market biogas mostly comes from landfill waste, with food and green waste also showing lots of potential.   

As mentioned previously, you can run a car on just about anything—algae, cheese, unreleased Michael Bolton b-sides, maybe?—it’s just a matter of how efficient it is and how bad you’ll sound/smell coming down the road. So while hydrogen is indeed abundant, that doesn’t mean it’s going to be in an available enough format for fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) to cover a full road trip.

However, as Toyota began working on this technology in 1992, and they’ve extensively crash tested with their high-pressure hydrogen tanks, it’s likely that we’re, at the very least, beyond the stage of where people should be concerned about driving around a four-wheel hydrogen bomb. Whether that’s enough to have a successful path through the current car climate remains to be seen.

*     *     *

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

Read Full Post »

I count on Emilio Estevez to appropriately deliver the weight of all bad news:

*     *     *

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

Read Full Post »

SpiroFlo covers the recent controversy over single-serving coffee cups waste, the inventor’s regret in even making the cups, and the landfill problems that still remain.

Maybe you’ve seen this video going around (NSFW: language). It’s got a bit of a “Cloverfield” vibe, but, you know, with a giant monster made of plastic single-serving coffee cups (or K-Cups):

It’s decently done, but like many marketing efforts, it’s too hip for its own good. Remember those Burger King ads where their mascot, the King, became weird and creepy? Sure, some were fun, but you know what it didn’t do? Make people want to buy more burgers. McDonald’s’ ads are boring—look: food + happy people—but showing your food for 30 seconds along with a jingle gets the job done.

What this video has done is increased my desire to pelt people in the face with K-Cups and/or create an army of giant evil monsters. Probably not what they were going for.

Interestingly enough, over the last month:

  1. The creator of K-Cups has stated he regrets making them (but already sold off the company in 1997); and
  2. Keurig has pledged to make their K-Cups 100% recyclable by 2020.

As for point A, I’ve already discussed thinking through the total environmental impact of your technology, but in 1997, that understanding wasn’t there in the same way it is today. As for B, there are recyclable K-Cups available now, but it essentially requires modifying your current Keurig machine and buying knockoff cups so, surprise, Keurig isn’t too into that.

Despite the buzz this generated, some of the biggest “convenience drink” perpetrators are still going on as is. Starbucks pledged to make their cups 100% recyclable by, well, now (they said 2015), but instead opted to sell reusable cups when it wasn’t cheap enough to remove the plastic coating from their disposable ones. Meanwhile, plastic water bottles also contend for which unrecyclable waste can load up landfills faster.

But hey, nobody’s made a video of monsters made from those yet.

*     *     *

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

Read Full Post »

Vortex Tools discusses why oil prices (and gasoline prices) have declined, the inefficiency of U.S. oil and gas, and what can be done to make a profit at low crude prices.  

If you haven’t kept track of the recent changes in oil and gas prices, here are the basics:

  • People are happy at the pump: Gasoline prices are at a four-year low (down 40% from six months ago). Eight states are expected to have gas below $2/gallon, and the 2015 nationwide average is projected to stay lower than 2014 average.
  • Oil and gas companies are scaling back: In addition to gasoline prices sitting at a four-year low, crude oil prices just hit a five-year low. Currently, they’re at the low-to-mid-$60s/barrel range. There are projections that the slump is not over, that these low prices could hold through 2016, and that oil may not get above $100/barrel again for a long time.

While there are natural ups and downs with commodity prices, this rapid decline was unforeseen by most, and the timing is bad for the industry. The Organization of Petroleum Countries (OPEC) reduced the oil estimates needed in 2015 by 300,000 barrels down to 28.9 million. Doesn’t seem like a lot percentage wise, but it’s the lowest in 12 years. With lower demand, drilling rig counts are down, 2015 budgets are getting slashed, and oil company stocks are falling.

Even with low prices, the Middle East has no plans to slow down their production. Some say this is a way to root out terrorist influence, others say it’s a way of protecting market share, but whatever the case, the success or failure of the U.S. oil and gas industry doesn’t majorly play into their plans.

What this has done is highlight the inefficiency of U.S oil and gas.

The Middle East claims that their costs per barrel are at about half of U.S. costs (and significantly lower than the average cost of all other countries), so $60/barrel oil may cut into their profits, but in the U.S., where $60-$64/barrel is considered break-even price for shale production, $60/barrel can be a breaking point.

Probably doesn’t hurt that Saudi Arabia has $700 billion in foreign currency reserves thanks to higher oil prices.

From: https://i1.wp.com/cdn.na16.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/scrooge-mcduck.jpg

Pretty much what I think of, head-into-coin injuries be damned

You can debate the profit mark—which will also fluctuate due to legislation, available technology, and world issues—but generally speaking, the U.S. oil and gas industry has two modes, both of which avoid efficiency:

  • When oil prices are high, they’re too busy to invest in innovation/efficiency and it’s full on drill, baby, drill!
  • When oil prices are low they don’t have any money to invest in innovation/efficiency.

These maxims hold true until legislation requires oil and gas companies to change, and 2015 is a year of legislation when it comes to making companies deal with flared gas, vented vapors, and the volatility of oil.

It also doesn’t help that U.S. companies largely focus on what will boost their stocks this quarter, even if it’s to the detriment of say, next quarter. Oil and gas companies care about their bottom line (which is good—you should make a profit in business), but they often don’t have the ability (read: time and/or money) to care about efficiency in their processes, even if doing so would greatly increase their bottom line.

I recently met with a customer that had posters everywhere that said something like, “Safety first, environment second, profit third.” I joked that the reality is actually, “Profit, profit, profit… and don’t get me fined while you’re at it.” This doesn’t make them villains. The reality is I’ve worked in enough green industries to know that the way you get people—individuals or business groups—to care about environmental issues is to make them money while doing good.

To be blunt: No company primarily cares about environmental issues when they’re facing heavy losses and/or going out of business.

Given that Vortex tools improve oil and gas efficiency and gives an environmental benefit, here’s some of what we can do (and are expecting to grow into more in the coming year):

2015 is set to be a rocky year for oil and gas producers/operators. It’s time to squeeze every bit of efficiency and value from production.

*     *     *

*Sources and image credit listed in the comments.

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

Read Full Post »

SpiroFlo shares the far-reaching effects that environmental technologies need to consider.

Whenever the holidays roll around, I like to look up all the awkward green approaches, but this last 4th of July, I noticed that the fun is gone. While I’ve previously noted that being green often coincides with my tendency to be a cheapskate, I’ve found the approaches to a green Thanksgiving—save the ultimate horror of tofurky—are rather dull.

NOfurky

Do you really need a reminder that it’s environmentally friendly to eat all your leftovers, or is the family cook threatening to kill you if you don’t eat turkey sandwiches for a week the main motivation?

Exactly. I welcome thee, Turkey Sandwich Apocalypse.

So again, what happened to all the fun green holiday ideas?

One of the big problems is that people started to think through what the complete process costs the environment. Suddenly wasting an entire morning on a green project that’s not all that impactful doesn’t seem so worthwhile (and that’s before signing up for the grind of the afternoon/evening meal with your extended family).

So sorry, Mother Earth, I’ve got a Mother-in-Law to deal with first.

Let’s go bigger: Given that we work on environmental issues, we get to hear how everyone and their mom has the greatest green idea ever!!!!! Until, you know, you actually start to work it through.

So, for example, Harry has an idea to reuse Chain Store X’s trash as an alternative fuel. He believes the store should give it to him for free, and that this process will solve landfill issue while displacing fossil fuels with a cleaner, energy-efficient fuel. In addition, Harry will create jobs and make gobs of money while making Mother Earth happy with his trash-to-fuel process.

Sounds great, until you start looking at the complete process. Once this happens, Harry will find that:

  1. Chain Store X will not give him their trash for free because, a) they don’t want to be held responsible for what some crazy unknown entity will do with their stuff (and the PR havoc that could cause); and b) once something has economic value it is no longer simply trash.
  2. Even if Harry can convince Chain Store X to give him their trash, he discovers that in order to go pick up enough trash, he has to get a fleet of gas guzzling dump trucks to route to his facility that runs on fossil fuels. He searches for alternatives but discovers that there are no economically viable energy sources—at least not any that are reliable and scalable enough—and that he doesn’t have nearly enough access to capital to develop his own. In calculating the carbon footprint of his facilities and transportation, Harry realizes that he’s essentially undoing the good he’s creating with his process.
  3. Harry again debates using his own super trash fuel for the above issues, but discovers that scaling the fuel starts to mess with supply and demand, that suddenly his fuel isn’t profitable at this level, and that no venture capitalist is willing to back his growth with the abysmal track record of cleantech startups that have blazed the same trails and burned up with the same mistakes.
  4. Finally, Harry discovers that his process creates a nasty byproduct that can’t be used anywhere. In addition, even the landfills won’t take this byproduct because it’s so toxic, so his great, clean fuel has created a series of problems that he didn’t know about until the process is already in motion, leaving him with a business model that no longer applies.

And so on and so on.

This kind of example sounds ridiculous, but corn ethanol facilities ran on fossil fuels (and that’s before they got into the associated water waste from such an inefficient process that created an unusable bounty of ugly byproduct).

However, more than likely, Harry will never get past complaining about the unfairness of big oil, greedy venture capitalists, and the monopolistic tendencies of the energy world. At best, he will turn a blind eye to the inefficiency he creates with his old, beat-up, alt-fuel pickup truck that runs for four days at a time without breaking down.

The reality is that you can make an alternative fuel from just about anything, but it’s a matter of:

  • How efficient the fuel is
  • How it scales to larger use
  • How economically viable it is to build/maintain the process/end-user device; and
  • How bad you’ll stink driving down the road

(The last one seems to apply the least to the “creative fuel” drivers I’ve met.)

So maybe this isn’t the thankful post I should be writing this time of year, but I’ve just seen a hundred too many cutesy environmental technology ideas that never really go anywhere while wasting a lot of time, money, and credibility. In the meantime, viable (yet in-progress) technologies get nitpicked by the very environmental crowd that will never support them anyway.

If you find the perfect technology, let me know. You should find it alongside a perfect relationship and an alternate reality where the Chicago Cubs finally win the World Series.

*     *     *

Okay, okay, we’ve got a lot to be thankful for… just not in this post. Have a great Turkey Day / mediocre Tofurky Day!

 

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »