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Posts Tagged ‘gas’

donald-trump1So I’ve been quiet for a wee while. Call it 10 months of quiet?

Part of it is that little has changed in the industries I work in:

Oil & Gas   

Every commodity has its ups and downs, but oil & gas has swirled around its latest downturn since June 2014. It’s the same old story: Ask a dozen talking heads why this happened and you’ll get a dozen different answers (bonus points if the speaker gives contradictory views of OPEC in the same hypothesis). Despite that, there are reasons to be hopeful, including rig counts increasing most weeks. While some of that is because exploration had stalled for long enough that eventually you can’t go anywhere but up, more rigs equals more new drilling, and new production—whether it should be or not—is the accepted indicator of oil & gas health in the U.S.

Despite these hopeful signs, as of early 2017, the industry is still largely on hold. Normally this happens in January each year because companies are still waiting for approved annual budgets to proceed with anything. In lean times, annual budgets can sometimes be held back until February or March. However, this year, everyone is waiting to see what President Trump will do. Whether individuals may have a favorable or negative view of Donald Trump, the oil & gas companies overall believe his policies will be favorable to the industry. How many regulations will be scaled back and how consistent he’ll be has yet to be seen, but in every meeting, every phone call, and every email, the same hold line comes up: “Let’s see what President Trump will do.”

Water

I’ll make this one short: People still don’t care about water.

There’s a belief that we will care about water someday soon, but it’s the same belief accompanied with the same inaction year after year. Even environmentalists don’t care that much about water. It still takes a backseat to solar power and wind power.

I met with a guy this week who talked about his company’s testing water standards 15-20 years ago. At the end of their filtration, they’d have some of the water off to the side, and place a catfish in there. If you killed that bottom feeder, then you knew you messed up. While standards have gotten more objective than seeing if you can keep from killing a bacteria loving vacuum-fish, they aren’t universal. Every industry needs regulation; the goal is to have good regulation—promoting safety for people and the environment while allowing businesses to pursue success—but it’s easy to get the pendulum swinging in the wrong direction.

Since I mentioned wind power and solar energy:

  • There are still (inaccurate) stories about too many birds getting diced by wind power turbines. What I don’t hear is that the wind power design you’re most likely to see are some of the least efficient. Making lighter blades, using lighter material—none of this changes the limitations of the design. Most of the better designs—that appear more static, but are better at generating energy off each vibration—don’t make it to market, but that’s any industry: the best design rarely gets the market share (or even a viable business).
  • Solar still has issues with sourcing the right metals. This metal needs to be A) affordable; and B) have consistent high conductivity. The issue is that it’s still hard to find both. If the metal is affordable, it’s often not in the U.S., but making sure you get what you paid for is harder when you’re thousands of miles away. Then, if the metal is of the right quality, it’s harder to get affordably and consistently. Thus any innovation of the solar power industry is still limited by basic sourcing issues.

Okay, so things are kind of stuck, but if there’s one thing I’ve learned is that anger does little to build anything meaningful. As Sam Rayburn said, “Any jackass can kick down a barn, but it takes a good carpenter to build one.” Whatever the future of water and oil & gas hold, I want to be a part of building it well.

Let’s get pushing.

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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Vortex Tools looks at the Toyota Mirai—one of the first commercially sold hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles. The Japanese car company’s latest video explores some of the more creative ways Toyota can run this fuel cell vehicle (FCV).

If you read the title, you know this one will be NSFW (due to language), but since warnings don’t really work well in snappy titles, sorry…

Anyway, this is the Toyota Mirai (“Mirai” means “future” in Japanese):

Toyota_mirai_trimmed

The Mirai was revealed in November 2014 and Toyota plans to build and sell 700 of them globally in 2015. The car will sell in the U.S. for about $60,000 and only in California at first. Japan already has subsidies in place, but at this stage, it is unclear what government incentives will help promote hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles in the States.

So how does it work?

Yes, the video is light on the extensive process of how they strip the hydrogen from manure then use it to fuel cars, but hey, it’s a three-minute marketing piece for the everyman.

On their site, Toyota even admits that this cow manure approach is more of an attention grabber (as part of their “Fueled By Everything” campaign) than a reliable, sustainable approach:

While cow manure contains plenty of hydrogen, it’s not commonly used in the U.S. to create the biogas needed for this process. Today’s market biogas mostly comes from landfill waste, with food and green waste also showing lots of potential.   

As mentioned previously, you can run a car on just about anything—algae, cheese, unreleased Michael Bolton b-sides, maybe?—it’s just a matter of how efficient it is and how bad you’ll sound/smell coming down the road. So while hydrogen is indeed abundant, that doesn’t mean it’s going to be in an available enough format for fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) to cover a full road trip.

However, as Toyota began working on this technology in 1992, and they’ve extensively crash tested with their high-pressure hydrogen tanks, it’s likely that we’re, at the very least, beyond the stage of where people should be concerned about driving around a four-wheel hydrogen bomb. Whether that’s enough to have a successful path through the current car climate remains to be seen.

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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Vortex Tools covers how low prices are shaping the budgets, workforce, and operations of oil and gas companies.

Even if you don’t know the specifics of the steep 2014 decline in oil prices, if you’re on social media, you’ve likely seen a pic or 10 of low prices at the gas pump. But there’s also a sense of wondering how long these low oil and gas prices will last. Depending on which talking head you listen to, some believe oil prices will stay low until the end of 2016, while others think oil could hit $200/barrel in the next few years.

However it goes, this is what’s currently happening in the oil and gas industry:

Large Budget Cuts: Typically budgets for the New Year are finalized by the end of January at the latest, but in 2015, many company budgets have been delayed. Right away this means that budgets are ~10% lower, as parts of January and February were put on hold expenditure-wise. Then, as budgets have come out, a lot of them are 40-50% lower than the year before (Pioneer Natural Resources’ capital expenditures dropped by 45%, Apache gutted $3.5 billion from the year previous). This means:

Layoffs: With companies losing billions in the fourth quarter of 2014, employee cuts have followed. BP laid off 300 Scottish workers in January and Halliburton plans to lay off 5,000-6,500 of their 80,000 workers. (As the VP Marketing for Vortex Tools, my inbox has seen a spike in job applications, too.) According to Fuel Fix, “Halliburton’s move brings the number of layoffs announced by the world’s four biggest oil field services in recent weeks to more than 30,000 workers around the world. That’s about 9.4 percent of their combined workforce.” Even with layoffs attempting to balance out costs and stock prices, there are still:

Equipment Cost Pains: Oil and gas prices may be down, the amount of workers may have dropped to meet the work pace, but it still costs about the same to complete a new well or work over an existing well.  In dealing with steep, hyperbolic decline shale wells—oil and gas wells that start with high, valuable production, but quickly reduce to lower rates—operators have to keep drilling to stay profitable, so there’s a lot of unavoidable cost.

These pain points mean that some companies won’t survive, whereas others are using this as an opportunity to lean up their business model and pursue a more efficient direction. One member of the Vortex team, Richard Haas, was an oil and gas operator for 36 years. He started when oil was worth $11 a barrel and gas 16 cents an MCF (adjusted prices still lower than today). In addition, gas value was not adjusted based on its BTU (or energy) equivalent—it all got valued the same no matter how much it fueled. Because of this, Richard knew how to wring every bit of oil or condensate from the production stream. Now that oil is at less than half the value of where it was eight months ago, it’s going to take that kind of efficiency thinking for companies to thrive at low oil prices.

With Vortex tools increasing production efficiency, reducing chemical/surfactant costs, and eliminating pollution fines, that type of required efficiency is available now.

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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Vortex Tools explores changes in international business, how oil and gas valuations are changing globally, a recent publication on increasing well efficiency/profitability, and how to find the best Chinese dumplings.  

I have a confession:

I no longer eat Chinese food in the United States.

Not because I’m some food snob, but because in the last couple of years, we started stepping up our international sales. Before, Vortex Tools sold internationally to Australia, Canada, and Mexico (among others), but now we also sell into China, India, and the Middle East. Naturally, international sales often involve a degree of international travel.

In traveling to China every 12-18 months, I eat nothing but Chinese food for a week straight. Oh, and the stuff they consider breakfast food is what the average American considers dinner food, so being a guy that typically likes Chinese food once or twice a month, eating it 20+ times in one week pretty much kills my desire to have it stateside.

(Which isn’t to say I don’t thoroughly enjoy the food there. One of our contractors speaks fluent Mandarin and walked around looking for a restaurant identified only by a doorway. “We’re looking for a doorway?” I said. “In China? Oh, I’m sure we’ll find this place any year now.” Sure enough, the contractor asked around for the door that led to great dumplings and people knew what he was talking about. We walked through a doorway that led to stairs to a basement restaurant serving the best dumplings you’ve ever had.)

Anyway, international business is changing. Overall, the global oil and gas industry is changing, too. The price of natural gas has gone up in India; while in the States the price of oil fell below $80 a barrel for the first time in a year (October 2014). Both of these led to oil and gas operators valuing efficiency more.

oil 80bbl

When natural gas prices are low, no one wants to build the pipelines to recover these low values, so the gas typically gets flared. Gas needs to hit a decent enough value to get recovered and sold. For oil, however, if the price is high, it’s full on drill, baby, drill with no time to consider efficiency. As prices drop and budgets get tighter, operators slow down enough to consider how to squeeze out more value from the well.

$80/barrel for oil is actually a frightful marker for many larger companies—especially those drilling shale wells, where the production rates decline fast enough that they need to keep drilling to keep the profits flowing. Larger companies have larger costs, and some believe they can’t turn a profit at $80/barrel.

So that’s where we’ve gotten more traction with Vortex tools in oil and gas efficiency. After extensive testing in the Austin Chalk and Eagle Ford formations (Texas), data noted that Vortex tools recover up to 10 times more natural gas liquids than conventional methods like pigging (read: shoving a brush down the pipeline). The NGLs are valuable, so greater efficiency = greater profit.

A recent ONG Marketplace article on Vortex Tools’ value in the Utica (Ohio/Pennsylvania) and Marcellus formations (same as before plus New York and West Virginia)—including increasing NGL/condensate recovery, preventing line freezing, and keeping wells in air quality compliance—is available here.

I can’t tell you what country I’ll be in three months from now, but one thing’s for sure: I’ll decline the offer for Chinese food.

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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Boom CoverEver wanted to ask a fracking expert a question? Now’s your chance. As in: right now.

Today, Wall Street Journal senior energy reporter and author of The Boom: How Fracking Ignited the American Energy Revolution and Changed the World Russell Gold is hosting an ‘Ask Me Anything’ on Reddit. You can connect with him here.

While the archive should remain active for a little while, these ‘Ask Me Anything” opportunities only last for a day… or until the participant gets fried by e-wave upon e-wave of questioning — note: it’s usually the latter.

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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Vortex Tools covers changes in oil and gas litigation and education efforts in Colorado.

The Colorado Oil and Gas Association (COGA) hosts a monthly ambassador series. The goal is to help educate the public on a number of oil and gas issues.

Overall, pro-oil and gas people are really stepping up their public messaging in Colorado for a couple of reasons:

  1. Colorado is largely seen as a purple state turning blue: Translation: Large key cities like Boulder, Denver and Fort Collins have become more liberal over the past 10 years, changing the political climate of what once was a largely conservative state. Currently, Democrats are likelier to be opposed to oil and gas than Republicans.
  2. Moratoriums and bans on fracking are passing in meaningful places: When Boulder banned fracking, much like Vermont’s ban, I considered it equivalent to a landlocked state banning the ocean, because they don’t have any oil and gas production, but now places with production are starting to see those legal moves, too. As mentioned last time, Colorado now has the most stringent air quality regulations in the nation.

As a result, Coloradans for Responsible Energy Development (CRED) are running TV ads on fracking facts, and overall, the oil and gas industry is realizing that if they don’t start speaking up (from a perspective other than that of large, multinational oil and gas companies), decisions will be based on info from just one side. As is, the pro oil and gas crowd is launching lawsuits against what they view as illegal methods in passing recent bans and moratoriums.

(The legal route may have a negative connotation to it, but both those for and against oil and gas use the legal system. I’ve seen the public step-by-step tactics to get fracking banned in a town—banning fracking basically shuts down the oil and gas industry—and while it isn’t pretty, it is effective.)

Beyond that, the pro side of oil and gas is trying to humanize the issue in a couple of ways:

  1. In understanding the concerns of the Average Joe: Most people have some reservations about oil and gas, especially when it comes to drilling near their home. It’s a fair and understandable concern, one that the oil and gas industry up until lately hasn’t valued. Part of that stems from a ‘you don’t understand’ mentality, but the oil and gas industry didn’t necessarily understand that ill-informed people vote to pass laws all the time, so even if you think someone doesn’t really know what they’re talking about on an issue, their vote carries the same weight. Now that this is starting to click, there’s a greater effort to share pro-oil and gas education.
  2. In humanizing the oil and gas industry: One debate tactic I don’t like is making caricatures of the opposition, because if they’re not real people, you don’t have to care. The oil and gas industry is often viewed as a bunch of tobacca-spittin’ fat cats who long for greater profits over safety. Sometimes they don’t even get that far and it’s a faceless industry designed to squash and ignore the rights of the common people.

As a result, the COGA ambassador series is equipping and encouraging people to identify themselves as workers in the oil and gas industry.

Note that I, for one, do not chew tobacco and/or go out of my way to put your health at risk (though admittedly, there’s a small part of me that hopes that one day I can pull off Jesse Ventura’s look in “Predator”).

Point #2—humanizing the oil and gas industry—is key, especially when people realize that jobs are at stake when cities start crippling the oil and gas industry (by banning fracking, etc.) COGA estimates that 7-9% of Colorado jobs are related to oil and gas. Even with Colorado unemployment rates dropping to 6.2% in January 2014 (when it was 7%+ in 2013), for many people, it’s understood—especially as the job rates issue has gone on for so long and the statistics are often lower than the reality—that you don’t mess with job security.

It’ll be interesting to see how Colorado evolves throughout the year.

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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Vortex Tools covers Colorado becoming the first state to control methane emissions at oil and gas sites, as well as noting its solution to help keep oil and gas companies in compliance with more stringent air quality standards. 

The Colorado Air Quality Commission just passed the strictest oil and gas air regulation issues in the nation, as they are the first to directly address and regulate emissions of methane gas (which is linked to climate change). For some, this is an overdue environmental necessity. For others, it’s one more attempt to shut down oil and gas production under the guise of purely health and environmental motivations.

Gov Hickenlooper (colorado.gov)

Gov Hickenlooper (colorado.gov)

After four days of hearings, on February 23rd, the state Air Quality Control Commission (AQCC) passed the motion by a vote of 8-1. They did so with support from Governor John Hickenlooper, environmental groups, and three large oil and gas operators — Anadarko, EnCana, and Noble Energy — along with Colorado’s largest natural gas gathering/processing company, DCP Midstream.

However, several smaller oil and gas companies, along with the Colorado Oil and Gas Association (COGA) and the Colorado Petroleum Association (CPA), opposed the far-reaching aspects of the regulations. COGA spokesman Doug Flanders noted, “Unfortunately, we were not successful in ensuring that the rule accommodates the differences in basins and operators. Nevertheless, we are committed to working with our operators, our communities and the state to successfully and effectively implement these rules.”

According to the Denver Business Journal, “State officials have pegged compliance costs at about $42.5 million a year, or less than $500 per ton of pollution eliminated. Executives at some of the Colorado’s biggest oil and gas companies have said the state’s estimate is in line with their estimates and a cost they consider acceptable.”

Funny thing about estimates that occur before regulations go into effect: they often fall woefully short once the laws of supply and demand kick in. If you must fix something to avoid fines (and yes, avoid damaging the environment), no one is surprised when the cost of fixing that requirement goes way up.

In addition:

The new operations standards are expected to remove from the air about 93,500 tons per day of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which can cook into ozone on hot, sunny days, state officials have said.

They’re also expected to cut methane leaks by about 65,000 tons per year, with the methane — a strong greenhouse gas — captured and redirected into pipelines bound for markets.

Methane: harmful even when not coming from the backside of a cow

Methane: harmful even when not coming from the backside of a cow

So how are these rules different?

1. The regulations affect all of Colorado

This is something oil and gas proponents don’t like because different areas can have different issues, so a blanket approach not only takes the power away from the individual counties to make their own decisions, but can potentially apply standards that don’t make sense to that area. Like an omnibus or a comprehensive reform bill, some things get over-regulated, where other things aren’t regulated enough. In addition, these sweeping decisions can also be viewed as a state power grab over what should be an ongoing area-by-area conversation. For example, attempts to ban fracking in Colorado went after a statewide approach, got shot down, and returned as county-by-county initiatives (with some successes, some failures).

However, understand this: Similar to how a ban on fracking essentially shuts down oil and gas production, over-regulating methane emissions in producing oil and gas wells can do the same thing. For activists opposed to oil and gas, this is simply a greater victory, but the Average Joe voter may not be aware of all the damaging effects of this sweeping move, especially to the local economy and jobs.

2. The regulations require routine checks for leaks

This makes sense. If equipment is malfunctioning or something needs to be repaired (because it’s not doing what it’s designed to do), it should be fixed. Regulators can check up to once a month and any issue needs to be resolved in 15 days or the company faces ongoing fines.

I’ve been to enough oil and gas conferences to where I’ve heard repeatedly that oil and gas companies state they’re not opposed to regulation, just bad regulation. A lot of the larger companies — like the four above — are stepping out ahead of regulations to embrace these changes. Many of them now realize that the concerns of the Average Joe towards oil and gas are important (even if those concerns are shaped by misinformation supplied by activists opposed to this energy industry). This should be an obvious understanding, but it’s only recently, with some fracking bans succeeding, that valuing these concerns has increased.

But why are these big four on the opposite side of a lot of the smaller companies? Part of it is innovation. I saw a presentation from XTO Energy where they were detailing changes to their standards to improve wildlife protection. They weren’t being forced; it seemed like an “everybody wins” business practice. However, these larger companies can also afford to take a slight hit in Colorado if it helps their PR elsewhere. Noble Energy I’m unsure on; they’re fairly committed to Colorado, but the last time strong oil and gas regulations showed up in Colorado, EnCana slashed their state budget to 10% of what it was the year before. If EnCana pulls back again, they still have a global business to work with, but Colorado takes a hit on the jobs they no longer provide, and the smaller oil and gas companies take a hit due to increased costs.

 3. The regulations specifically target methane

Prior legislation only regulated volatile organic compounds (VOCs). When referring to oil and gas emissions, VOCs typically mean harmful gases and vapors. Previously, no other state has regulated methane, as it’d be difficult to enforce throughout the oil and gas chain. Which brings us to the next point:

4. The regulations include the entire natural gas chain

This includes “the well site, storage tanks, gathering lines and compression stations as well as processing plants.”

I’m all for preventing methane issues — especially in leaking and abandoned wells that should have their environmentally negligent issues addressed — but there are ongoing production areas that will become an issue. I mentioned above that methane regulation would be difficult to enforce throughout the entire chain. It’s not tough to enforce because the EPA doesn’t have the means — they have infrared cameras on helicopters to fly over and fine with ease — it’s tough to enforce because so many parts of producing wells have problems that stem from moving gas, especially with the 95% compliance rate they’ve set.

Natural gas is hard to control. It’s not like you can just grab it in scoops and stick it a giant zip lock bag that’ll never leak, and once it’s loose, there is no amazing net to swat over this loose natural gas to reel it back in.

As with many issues in the oil and gas industry, solutions shift once the existing solution is regulated away.

Vortex Tools has a solution to vented methane emissions at the well site. As with VOCs, the Vortex tool spins the flow of oil, gas, water, and natural gas liquids. By doing so, much of what would be fugitive vapors are converted to liquids and not allowed to escape at the culprit atmospheric release points. This allows operators to remain in compliance with EPA air standards (customer data shows negligible vapors at the well site, even at 103-degree F ambient daytime temperatures) and recover more valuable oil, condensate, and natural gas liquids to boot.

Vortex vapor recovery tool

Vortex vapor recovery tool

For more info on this application, email me at colin (at) vortextools (dot) com.

Of course, the largest sources of methane emissions still belong to termites and volcanoes, but bugs, exploding lava, and giant smoke clouds don’t listen to regulations. Maybe we’ll work on a solution to them next.

For now, it will be interesting to see if other states follow the standards set here or if it’s simply a Colorado-only effect for all the good and bad these regulations can bring.

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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