Feeds:
Posts
Comments

SpiroFlo and Vortex Tools comment on changes in Colorado—both in the recession of oil & gas and the rise of the marijuana industry.Marijuana

Despite being the VP Marketing for multiple companies, it’s rare I do a crossover blog where I represent more than one company at a time, as the marketing reality that most people only care about stories that impact their industry or scratch their interest (duh). However, since the business landscape in Colorado has shifted over the last year, we’ve seen changes that affect different industries, so here we go. Firstly:

Oil and Gas Has Scaled Back Out of Colorado

Overall, it’s been a brutal year for oil and gas. The top four global companies scaled back 10% of their work force… and that was just the beginning. The cuts have continued and spread to smaller companies. Companies have scaled back to their core assets, selling off the rest, and for most, those core assets aren’t in Colorado. Blame asset valuations, blame stricter regulations, but week after week, formerly prominent oil and gas companies are leaving Colorado,* or filing for bankruptcy, or, at the very least, not spending money on anything.

*Usually right about here I’d link up a few stories of this happening, but there are so, so many. Right now you can Google “Denver oil and gas company” every week and pop up a negative story, but hey, gasoline prices are low, so many don’t care.

Most analysts now believe oil and gas prices will not recover until 2017. Prices have dipped again in October and November this year due to refinery maintenance season (during times of cheap oil, they’re at high capacity, so any time one goes down for a period of time, it hurts an already stressed market). In addition, many wells are currently shut in, so when prices do inch up a bit, everyone’s going to rush to take advantage of that gain, flood the market with production glut, and, you got it,  tank the price again.

This means it should be a time of improving existing production—lowering operation costs, recovering more production/valuable liquids (condensates and natural gas liquids), and avoiding environmental fines (easiest way: by not polluting)—the kinds of applications Vortex Tools enable, but many of the employees who are left are just keeping their heads down and trying not to get laid off. This should also be a time of asset expansion for smart investors (the adage of “buy low, sell high” still applies), but for many oil and gas companies, they’re not doing much of anything save staving off going out of business.

At the same time:

Marijuana is Booming in Colorado

As one of the first states to legalize recreational marijuana, a whirlwind of industry has set up around this venture, but it’s still a complicated (and energy intensive) market. Energy companies call pot one of the most energy intensive ventures. In one Colorado service area, retail marijuana makes up for ~1% of retail electricity use. Increased electricity use was one of the ways (illegal) pot growers used to get caught—turns out when your electricity bills spike several times over what they used to be, people take notice, and the assumption is you aren’t just plugging in a slew of outlet air fresheners.

In addition to high electricity use, the marijuana industry uses a lot of water, and currently, what’s going down the drain untreated shouldn’t be (lots of nitrates, fertilizers, chemicals, etc.). Most everyone involved in the industry is surprised that the law hasn’t changed yet and that it’s a matter of time until it does. However, there’s a misconception that the marijuana industry has a lot of money, but most players do not. Once laws change to get more stringent, a lot of smaller operations that hopped into this growing industry will burn out. In addition, the marijuana industry has also been sold a lot of snake oil already, so there’s a lot of skepticism for even valid solutions.

That’s where SpiroFlo comes in. With no moving parts and no additional energy source required, there are two main applications we work in: 1) Reducing the amount of water used and improving the water quality/oxygen content of what’s left: Basically improved hydroponics—growing better plants faster with fewer resources. 2) Removing contaminants from water drainage: Most people expect the laws to change on this within the next 12 months, so spinning out contaminants from water used for marijuana will become important (and will be a determining factor in which companies go out of business). Given that we’ve done similar applications in other markets, we’ve got both credibility and low operating expenses covered.

As a company, SpiroFlo sat down and discussed the moral side of it, as marijuana is in a strange place: It’s legal in certain states, but not nationally, which causes issues with banking and credit. Then investors want to play games, too. They recognize there’s money to be made here, but they don’t want the negative association. Currently the general rule is: If you touch the plant, investors can’t fund you. However, if you help the people who do touch the plant, then they can fund you.

Yeah…

Anyway, we sat down as a company and had the moral conversation on marijuana and the conclusion we came to is this: When it comes to industries you can’t work with for moral reasons, where do you draw the line? What issues are more important than others? Even in Vortex Tools’ work in oil and gas, there are people who don’t like the industry enough to acknowledge the value in our tools reducing pollution, energy, and operational costs while increasing the efficiency and revenue generators from the oil and gas production. Regardless, some issues are gimmes to avoid (hint: you don’t have to discuss them as an organization, or if you do, you’ll be doing so in prison), marijuana isn’t. Not anymore. So we looked at our company goal as SpiroFlo, which is to reduce water use and improve the quality of the water left. Regardless of what different employees thought of the marijuana industry, we agreed that while it’s here, we should do what we can to improve water use.

Colorado Business is Going to Look Different

So overall, what this means is that oil and gas in Colorado will be replaced by the marijuana industry. However, that’s not the only business sector being replaced; it’s happening all over. There is little warehouse/retail space left to lease and what is left over is high above market value. Due to the population influx, residential rents are above what they should be, too. Yet all of this could bend as laws become more stringent or more states legalize marijuana. For now, this is a common sentiment from many Coloradoans:

stop-moving-to-colorado-bumper-sticker-car-1024x768

*     *     *

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

Advertisements

Vortex Tools looks at the recent Volkswagen emissions scandal. 

It’s a new week, which means it’s time for another story featuring environmental failure.

Admittedly, that’s the reality of most news. If it doesn’t fall under tragedy, villainy, or novelty, it doesn’t get much play, so in the environmental world, you often get stuck reviewing stories of the impending global warming apocalypse, eco-villains circumventing environmental regulations, or novelty technologies that are more entertaining that sustainable (I’m looking at you, anything that begins with “Give me your trash…”).

This week, it was door #2—eco-villains circumventing environmental regulations—with Volkswagen admitting to skirting EPA car emissions. If you haven’t been following the story, here’s what you need to know:

  • More cars on the road leads to increased carbon emissions. We’ve sought to taper this down via technology (improving the fuel source and vehicular design) and regulation (EPA emissions standards). Plenty of people have disputed the approach of both. Some say we should have left gasoline behind long ago; others argue that the efficiency of unleaded gasoline isn’t worth the slim environmental benefits it brings.
  • Here’s what you can’t do: You can’t design your car to get around regulations. That’s what Volkswagen did in their 2009-2015 model diesel engine cars (and those sold under the Audi brand) in the United States. Basically the car software detects when it’s being tested for NOx emissions then enables controls to automatically pass the test. Easy A, right?
  • So now, while your sweet ride’s engine performed better with improved gas mileage, pollution limits are believed to be 40 times above the legal limit. If you were to put that in drinking terms, this is equivalent to the kind of drunk that has you waking up in a different state without pants or memory of the last 12 hours. Except in this case, it’s not a body or a car taking the damage, it’s a planet. The current count on these modified vehicles recalled is 11,000.
  • In the wake of the scandal, Volkswagen stock prices and consumer ratings have plummeted. Although he states he was unaware of the software modifications, Volkswagen’s Chief Executive Martin Winterkorn stepped down on September 23rd. They’re now looking at legal consequences and losses which are expected to equate to billions.
  • Volkswagen has since hired the same law firm (Kirkland & Ellis) that defended BP after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. While I imagine that doesn’t inspire trust in the Volkswagen consumer, BP still turned a profit the year of that oil spill. With Volkswagen being the second largest automobile maker in the world, they’ll be looking for a similar “successful” result.

However, the big thing in all this is that I’ll forever cringe when I see a picture of a hippie next to an old slug bug.

Found on activerain.com

Found on activerain.com

*     *     *

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

A year old, but still good (photo credit):

FireHazard

*     *     *

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

SpiroFlo reviews the recent pollution of the Animas River and why the Environmental Protection Agency is unable to respond quickly.

The big environmental story this week is the Gold King Mine wastewater spill in the Animas River. If you aren’t familiar with the story:

  • The Animas River—named by a Spanish explorer as the “River of Souls”—is part of the Colorado River System. At 126 miles long, the river begins in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado and flows into New Mexico.
  • Silverton, Colorado was a gold mine town (until the last mine closed in 1991). On August 5th, while working on the Gold King Mine near Silverton, an EPA-contracted company accidentally broke the dam holding back a tailing pond (a somewhat neutral term for a pond full of metals and waste from mining). Their intended task was to pump out and treat the contaminated mine water.
  • Over 3,000,000 gallons of this wastewater and tailings (the non-revenue materials/minerals from mining) flooded the Animas River. As of August 11th—six days after the initial breach—acidic water drainage from the metal mine continued to flow out at a rate of 500-700 gallons per minute. The pollution rates were updated (for the worse) and will likely continue to be so as the story progresses.
  • The wastewater spill affected waterways in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and parts of the Navajo Nation (in those areas).

As a result of the spill, the Animus River, which usually looks like this…

AnimasNormal

…turned orange within 24 hours…

AnimasOrange

…and later turned green:

AnimasGreen

Although the EPA has taken responsibility for the environmental disaster, they have been criticized for waiting a day before telling anyone. Other criticisms include giving inaccurate information (it’s usually the EPA who releases the numbers on spills like this—they’re just usually not also responsible, thereby creating a conflict of interest).

At first, there was no testing of the river contents. Some say this came about due to the changing water conditions; others noted that problems such as lead poisoning can be hard to detect. What we do know is that lead poisoning is linked to slowing child development and increasing learning disabilities (there are good reasons why lead paint got banned from homes). Given what’s in a gold mine, heavy metals are a guarantee—the kind of minerals that the EPA rightfully regulates away from air, earth, and water.

The Denver Post reported that, when river water was tested 15 miles downstream from Durango, Colorado, iron levels were 326 times the domestic water limit allowed by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. Iron levels were recorded at 100 times above the limit. CNN noted these iron levels as being 12,000 times higher than normal. CNN also noted the Animas River had “extremely high levels of arsenic, cadmium, beryllium and mercury. It also contained zinc, iron and copper.”

As a result of this, several people are deciding whether to sue the EPA. However, many believe this course of legal action won’t even be possible. Some have labeled the EPA the Environmental Pollution Agency and believe that if a private corporation had done that they’ve done, they’d have the CEO’s picture posted everywhere as a villain, and the EPA would be pushing for punitive justice. Now that the EPA is responsible, that pursuit of justice is a lot more leisurely.

Farmington, New Mexico has 90 days’ worth of drinking water before they have to pump in from elsewhere. However, some claim that, even within a week, water toxicity levels around the Durango area were back to pre-catastrophe levels. Brings to mind that old slogan “Dilution is the solution.” Regardless, many believe the impact of this polluted water won’t be fully seen for months, and that the EPA is moving too slow in the clean-up process.

So why does this clean up seem to be taking so long? There are two main reasons:

  • Bureaucracy: I know it’s a term that’s thrown around often, but when you’re dealing with a government agency that usually has to wait to go through public hearings and approval processes (all while some believe they wind up promoting their greased palm connections anyway), it makes it hard to respond to emergencies. You would think there would be an emergency protocol, and even if there is, that’s subject to abuse, too. Suddenly every project is an emergency…
  • Any private company that helps with the clean up becomes liable for its success. That’s right: While the EPA will likely not be held liable for the mess they made, if your company helps clean it up, you could be held responsible for the mess you didn’t make. While I understand there must be some standards for any company that’s signing up for a lot of important work, you can understand why plenty of viable technology companies would say no thanks. The EPA might as well put up a sign that reads “Now hiring scapegoats.”

The really scary thing is, thanks to several industries, there are hundreds of thousands of retaining ponds just like this (which the EPA were trying to fix), usually in pristine areas. The SpiroFlo series of companies has solutions for spinning these toxic minerals out of water, but we’re not looking to break into the scapegoat business. Sorry.

*     *     *

As always, sources are in the comments.

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

SpiroFlo discusses food waste and how media is made and received.

It’s the biggest political story of the week: No, not the Republican Presidential Debate, but that Jon Stewart left “The Daily Show.”

This means:

my-condolences-news-nowhere-jon-stewart-KlT

Maybe it’s that modern-day media consumption travels faster than the speed (and timing) of truth; maybe it’s that objectivity can’t compete ratings-wise with caricature news anchors giving their spin on today’s stories; maybe it’s that huge, complex issues are distilled down to skewed memes and soundbites, but if you can’t entertain people quickly with your coverage of a news story, you might as well not bother. The truth or important points? Eh, if they happen to be bundled right, sure, why not? They can tag along.

Want proof? This is currently the most shared clip from the GOP debate:

Now there’s a statement that’ll draw people to the voting booth to steer the U.S. political future onward…

Did that clip summarize the approach of the top Republican Presidential candidates? I mean, it reminded me that Donald Trump having diplomatic conversations is a risky endeavor, but that’s about it.

So why bring this up? I bring it up because food waste is becoming much muttered about topic. Not talked about—because talking is louder than muttering—and certainly not yelled about, but it’s an issue that’s garnering more discussion in environmentalist circles. Lately I discussed how a local farm uses expired food to reduce waste and enhance sustainability, but there’s nothing wrong with most of the food getting thrown away. Here are some basics:

  • 40% of all food grown in the U.S. never gets eaten. Part of this is due to strict aesthetic standards (because we all know our bellies feel worse digesting ugly food); part of this is due to it being cheaper for small businesses to throw it away (blame unreliable tax benefits), but that’s a lot of food, especially when you consider how many families—both globally and in the States—don’t have enough food. The term is now “food insecure families.”
  • Despite only purchasing the pertiest fruit and veggies, Americans throw away $165 billion in food every year. This has increased by 50% since 1974. You can look up the graphic showing football stadiums full of discarded food—because it’s always football stadiums (or, every four years, Olympic-sized swimming pools)—but it’s a lot of grub. Some of this has to do with arbitrary expiration dates. Outside of baby formula, there’s no government requirement to have them, and since these “best by” / “sell by” / “use by” / “just buy more by” dates are set by those who want to sell you more of their product, it’s not surprising that these dates pass by long before these food items go bad.
  • So we’ve got wasted food, wasted labor, increased methane emissions (from excess food in landfills), and the ugly reality of some throwing away mountains of excess food while others go hungry.

I’m not going to pretend I’ve never thrown away food—I’ve found things in the back of my fridge that should not be able to move like that—but these numbers are worthy of attention and improvement.

There’s just one problem: Facts are boring.

Okay, two problems: Facts are boring and if they don’t hurt enough people, things don’t change.

But then some people made a documentary called “Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story.” The facts you read above? Most of them came from it. But documentaries are boring. Sure, we’re willing to stare at screens all day, but just one documentary? One that goes longer than a standard TV segment? That’s asking a lot, but here’s the trailer:

But then “Last Week Tonight” with John Oliver covered food waste. Same facts, more humor, a lot more YouTube views. Honestly, I’m surprised that they held the attention of many for over 17 minutes, but there’s a lot of hook in being alumni from “The Daily Show.” I‘m not even opposed to comedy shows like this—if anything, it shows that comedians hold more gravitas than your average news anchor—but it’s clear that how we distribute and receive media on important topics has a limited and skewed path. Anyway, enjoy the Donald Trump zinger. The joke came out last month and is more relevant today:

*     *     *

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

Vortex Tools discusses the Northern Colorado Energy Summit (#2015EnergySummit) and an energy future based on low oil and gas prices.

Last week I spoke at the Northern Colorado Energy Summit in Loveland, Colorado (#2015EnergySummit). That’s me—second from the right—missing the suit jacket memo:

EnergySummitPic

As the Summit was titled “Drilling Down: The Economic Impact of Declining Energy Prices,” Vortex Tools was invited to speak on our applications recovering more oil condensates and reducing operational costs. We’ll be speaking on similar topics at the Rocky Mountain Energy Summit conference: August 24th-27th, 2015.

As with any trade show, the NoCo Energy Summit had booths loaded with swag (“I don’t know what this is, but I’m taking it anyway”), free meals and coffee, a fat stack of business cards exchanged, and, if you weren’t farting around on your smartphone the whole time, some great info to be gleaned from the panels. Of note:

Oil Prices Will Remain Low

I know, you get 10 speculators on stage and you’ll get 10 different opinions as to why oil and gas prices are low and if/when they’ll come back, but when you average them all out, very few think oil prices will get much above $60/barrel by year’s end. You can blame strict air quality regulations; you can blame the recent Iran deal; you can blame the downturn in the Chinese stock market (like I said, multiple speculators equals multiple opinions), but even with the small ups and downs this year, oil prices remain low overall.

Dan Kearney is the Senior Business Development Analyst with Noble Energy. When asked about whether the worst is over with low oil prices, he said, “I think we’re in between storms, and that we’ll continue to be between storms.” A recent uptick in oil prices led to producers flooding the market—hoping to grab part of that value increase along with everyone else—and this saturated the market, dropping oil prices back down again.

Another Low is Coming in 2015

Sarp Ozkan is an oil and gas Market Analyst for Ponderosa Energy. When asked the same question as above, he said that the next oil price drop will come in October or November this year. That seemed more specific than the rest, but he had good reason: That’s refinery maintenance season (and they’re currently running at 90%+ of capacity—leading to problems when they’re shut down).

$100+/Barrel Oil Wasn’t Very Realistic (Or Likely to Return Soon)

So things aren’t looking too great for 2015 oil prices and, as noted during the Summit, no OPEC country is balancing its budget at $50 oil. While some lament that $100/barrel oil is far, far away (if ever again), Ozkan ran the numbers as to where the oil and gas market can do well with lower prices. After factoring in lower commodity prices, increased regulations, and reducing operational costs to keep up, the price-per-barrel point to see good margins was $65/barrel. $60/barrel was about breakeven; below that was a loss; but $65/barrel is the marker where the industry profitability opens back up. At least that’s one analyst’s view.

The Global Middle Class is Growing and Needs Energy

Tisha Schuller was the President/CEO of the Colorado Oil and Gas Association (COGA) for five years and now serves as Project Director for Stanford University’s Natural Gas Initiative. Schuller began her career as an environmentalist, but became an oil and gas advocate for two main reasons:

  1. When comparing the total impact (energy output versus environmental imprint) of oil and gas versus alternative energy options, the numbers were heavily in favor of oil and gas; and
  2. She realized that giving access to this abundant energy resource is one of the best things you do for impoverished communities. Otherwise you are limited by daylight and what your body can do. Even in Colorado, abundant and affordable energy is valuable. For those living below the poverty line, 25% of their income is spent on energy. Schuller also noted that pesky detail that everything you’re standing on, sitting on, leaning on, texting on comes from petroleum.

As the breakfast keynote speaker, Schuller noted some reasons to be positive despite the down energy market:

  • Although it feels like the middle class in the U.S. is getting smaller, the global middle class is growing—mostly in Asia. According to Reuter’s, it will more than double in size by 2030.
  • With this growth will come great demand for energy, and 84% of it will be from oil and gas. It is currently estimated the need will be above the supply. When it comes to basic economics, you know what that does to prices.
  • Many believe that this will enable the U.S. to export oil. As someone later stated, “If Iran can, the U.S. should be able to also.” Analysts believe that the U.S. leaves $5.50/barrel of profit on the table by not exporting oil.
  • Operational costs continue to come down (hello, Vortex tools) as do emissions. Currently, CO2 emissions in the U.S. are down to 1992 levels. The U.S. is the only country to achieve this as a free market.

So the oil and gas market has reasons to be hopeful; just most of them aren’t showing up in 2015…

*     *     *

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

SpiroFlo discusses reusing food for animals, creating compost, and the joy of exploding watermelons.  

Why did nobody ever tell me that you can be sustainable by launching rotten watermelons from the back of a pickup truck?

I recently visited my in-laws close to Durango, Colorado (near the New Mexico border). As they have a small farm out back of their house, all those animals need feeding. This includes the dogs, goats, pigs, peacocks, chickens, horses, and the cats with extra toes, missing eyes, and country music star names. One of the ways to feed all these mouths is with the help of the local food bank.

If you didn’t know, the U.S. throws a lot of food away. Some of it has nothing wrong with it (more on that food waste another time), but as the donations the food bank receives are already a little past their “best” date, inevitably, some of it is too far gone for human consumption. But you know who doesn’t care? Pigs and chickens.

So this happens:

farmfood1

Basically, the food bank now leaves all this expired grub out for pick up. The in-laws grab all this food, load it in their back of their truck, then drive it home. After reversing the truck into the yard, you get to launch this food all over. We’re talking fruit, veggies, bread, etc. Lobbing watermelons across the yard is, of course, the best part. Even almost accidentally splooshed a peacock with one (I did pelt a pig while wildly machinegunning rolls—didn’t seem phased). Finally, you get the tractor and push all this food into a giant dirt mountain.

By doing so:

  • Food doesn’t go to waste
  • The chickens have something to do the next few days (wandering around the dirt mound, pecking for food), so they don’t peck each other; and
  • Any food left in the dirt mound becomes compost

Oh, and that giant food mess in the yard? It’s eaten up in less than 24 hours (save the mountain of relish I dumped out from a giant jar—apparently even chickens have standards about that).

Thus it’s official: Using expired food for farm animals is my recycling happy place.

*     *     *

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).