Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for March, 2015

SpiroFlo covers the recent controversy over single-serving coffee cups waste, the inventor’s regret in even making the cups, and the landfill problems that still remain.

Maybe you’ve seen this video going around (NSFW: language). It’s got a bit of a “Cloverfield” vibe, but, you know, with a giant monster made of plastic single-serving coffee cups (or K-Cups):

It’s decently done, but like many marketing efforts, it’s too hip for its own good. Remember those Burger King ads where their mascot, the King, became weird and creepy? Sure, some were fun, but you know what it didn’t do? Make people want to buy more burgers. McDonald’s’ ads are boring—look: food + happy people—but showing your food for 30 seconds along with a jingle gets the job done.

What this video has done is increased my desire to pelt people in the face with K-Cups and/or create an army of giant evil monsters. Probably not what they were going for.

Interestingly enough, over the last month:

  1. The creator of K-Cups has stated he regrets making them (but already sold off the company in 1997); and
  2. Keurig has pledged to make their K-Cups 100% recyclable by 2020.

As for point A, I’ve already discussed thinking through the total environmental impact of your technology, but in 1997, that understanding wasn’t there in the same way it is today. As for B, there are recyclable K-Cups available now, but it essentially requires modifying your current Keurig machine and buying knockoff cups so, surprise, Keurig isn’t too into that.

Despite the buzz this generated, some of the biggest “convenience drink” perpetrators are still going on as is. Starbucks pledged to make their cups 100% recyclable by, well, now (they said 2015), but instead opted to sell reusable cups when it wasn’t cheap enough to remove the plastic coating from their disposable ones. Meanwhile, plastic water bottles also contend for which unrecyclable waste can load up landfills faster.

But hey, nobody’s made a video of monsters made from those yet.

*     *     *

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Vortex Tools shares a graphic of the oil rig developments rising up since 2011, then rapidly declining in early 2015.

Over the last six months, I’ve shared a few posts on the impact of low oil prices (see here, here, and here).  However, since a picture is worth a thousand words, here’s the steep drop in active rigs in a graph. Yet thanks to modern efficiency, you’ll notice oil production continues to climb:

active rigs v oil production

If a picture is worth a thousand words how much is an animation worth? Head over to Bloomberg to watch an animation of the US-wide oil rig count falling by over 45% from 1,595 rigs in October 2014 to 866 rigs in March 2015.

*     *     *

Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for coal, biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

 

Read Full Post »