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Archive for March, 2014

SpiroFlo looks at Gallup polling on how Americans view President Obama’s handling of the nation’s environment, energy policy, and prosperity.

Each year Gallup asks Americans if they think the President is doing a good job or a poor job at handling three key issues, and over the course of a President’s term, you can usually watch the that approval rating slide on down. Here’s how President Obama is faring since 2009:

Gallup polling Obama env good job

Although it’s not surprising that he ranks highest in protecting the U.S. environment, his 79% “good job” rating took a large fall in just one year (along with everything else) to just above 50% and has not recovered. Not surprisingly, President Obama has far greater approval with Democrats than Republicans (with independents leaning towards the Republican view of things):

Gallup polling Obama env good job by party However, as you can see, President Obama’s initial (2009) “good job” numbers were 10-15 points higher than where former President George W. Bush was in his first year (2001):

Gallup polling Bush env good job

Given the current trends, it is likely that, in his final year, President Obama will not dip below where President Bush was in his final year—especially given the financial pain of 2008 and how that affected Bush’s “good job” rating in prosperity. However, President Obama’s “good job” ratings plummeted more in that single 2009 to 2010 year than any of Bush’s single-year drops (likely due to the hope and change campaign message that encouraged his election).

If there is one thing that surprises me, it’s the contrast between President Bush’s “good job” rating in improving the nation’s energy policy versus President Obama’s. Taken at the six-year mark—2006 for Bush, 2014 for Obama—you can see that Obama is 17 points higher than where Bush was (42% to 25% respectively). While neither sees much success in this area, Gallup gives no indication as to the criteria in answering this question. Your political affiliation, coupled with your view of oil and gas, clean energy, and world politics, can shift your interpretation of that question dramatically. Regardless, overall, former President Bush settled out far lower than President Obama in this area.

Still, however you view it, the bottom line of presidential ratings sliding down over the years holds true.

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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Vortex Tools covers changes in oil and gas litigation and education efforts in Colorado.

The Colorado Oil and Gas Association (COGA) hosts a monthly ambassador series. The goal is to help educate the public on a number of oil and gas issues.

Overall, pro-oil and gas people are really stepping up their public messaging in Colorado for a couple of reasons:

  1. Colorado is largely seen as a purple state turning blue: Translation: Large key cities like Boulder, Denver and Fort Collins have become more liberal over the past 10 years, changing the political climate of what once was a largely conservative state. Currently, Democrats are likelier to be opposed to oil and gas than Republicans.
  2. Moratoriums and bans on fracking are passing in meaningful places: When Boulder banned fracking, much like Vermont’s ban, I considered it equivalent to a landlocked state banning the ocean, because they don’t have any oil and gas production, but now places with production are starting to see those legal moves, too. As mentioned last time, Colorado now has the most stringent air quality regulations in the nation.

As a result, Coloradans for Responsible Energy Development (CRED) are running TV ads on fracking facts, and overall, the oil and gas industry is realizing that if they don’t start speaking up (from a perspective other than that of large, multinational oil and gas companies), decisions will be based on info from just one side. As is, the pro oil and gas crowd is launching lawsuits against what they view as illegal methods in passing recent bans and moratoriums.

(The legal route may have a negative connotation to it, but both those for and against oil and gas use the legal system. I’ve seen the public step-by-step tactics to get fracking banned in a town—banning fracking basically shuts down the oil and gas industry—and while it isn’t pretty, it is effective.)

Beyond that, the pro side of oil and gas is trying to humanize the issue in a couple of ways:

  1. In understanding the concerns of the Average Joe: Most people have some reservations about oil and gas, especially when it comes to drilling near their home. It’s a fair and understandable concern, one that the oil and gas industry up until lately hasn’t valued. Part of that stems from a ‘you don’t understand’ mentality, but the oil and gas industry didn’t necessarily understand that ill-informed people vote to pass laws all the time, so even if you think someone doesn’t really know what they’re talking about on an issue, their vote carries the same weight. Now that this is starting to click, there’s a greater effort to share pro-oil and gas education.
  2. In humanizing the oil and gas industry: One debate tactic I don’t like is making caricatures of the opposition, because if they’re not real people, you don’t have to care. The oil and gas industry is often viewed as a bunch of tobacca-spittin’ fat cats who long for greater profits over safety. Sometimes they don’t even get that far and it’s a faceless industry designed to squash and ignore the rights of the common people.

As a result, the COGA ambassador series is equipping and encouraging people to identify themselves as workers in the oil and gas industry.

Note that I, for one, do not chew tobacco and/or go out of my way to put your health at risk (though admittedly, there’s a small part of me that hopes that one day I can pull off Jesse Ventura’s look in “Predator”).

Point #2—humanizing the oil and gas industry—is key, especially when people realize that jobs are at stake when cities start crippling the oil and gas industry (by banning fracking, etc.) COGA estimates that 7-9% of Colorado jobs are related to oil and gas. Even with Colorado unemployment rates dropping to 6.2% in January 2014 (when it was 7%+ in 2013), for many people, it’s understood—especially as the job rates issue has gone on for so long and the statistics are often lower than the reality—that you don’t mess with job security.

It’ll be interesting to see how Colorado evolves throughout the year.

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home), industrial water purification (biofilm removal), and reduced water pumping costs.

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, dairy waste, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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