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Archive for April, 2013

SpiroFlo shares some pilot confessions on how long your flight really takes, the truth on turning off your electronics during takeoff and landing, and where pilots can use their in-flight (licensed) guns.  

A while back I commented on one of the ways airlines lie to us.

“We’ll make it up in the air” is a bogus phrase because of how little time they can make up vs. how much fuel they’ll waste, yet you often still land on time. How so? Because airlines lie about how long flights actually take. This happens partly because a) moving multiple people naturally involves contingency; and b) if said people knew about said contingency, there’d be a pile of gripes

I’ve got a friend who’s a pilot. This friend texts from the plane. While in flight.

At first I thought, “Shouldn’t you be watching the road, or uh, the sky in front of you?” According to him, with so much of plane travel being automated, he could stare at the console the whole time and likely still take off and land safely.

That bit about turning off your electronics during takeoff and landing? My pilot friend thinks it’ll go away soon, as all they really get is a bit of hum over the equipment. He’s legally allowed to keep a gun in the cockpit, too, but only there and only on his plane. A pilot recently lost his license because he came out if the cockpit, gun brandished, and tried to commit a citizen’s arrest. The belligerent passenger called him on it, and as the pilot’s authority stopped at the locked door at the front of the plane, he’d overstepped the limit of where and how he could use that weapon.

Maybe you’re like me where you wonder what would happen if a pilot was placed in the unfortunate position where he had to fire on someone trying to get into the cockpit. I know they’d be half-deaf firing that thing in such a small space, but what if they miss and the bullet strikes the plane? I’ve seen action movies where someone gets sucked out of that teeny depressurized hole.

Apparently it doesn’t work that way either. You can cover the hole up and will be fine until landing. A towel will probably do (hope they don’t hit the window or a passenger).

Now action movies aren’t accurate? Maybe cool guys do look at explosions.

Well, here’s what I planned to write about in this blog: Recently I was on a business trip—an early flight from the Midwest. De-icing (where they spray chemicals all over the plane to remove/prevent freezing) was a gimme.

That day I got a pilot who was publicly honest over the intercom: “We’re going to turn off the air because the de-icing fluid smells bad,” he said. “You can try fiddling with your air port above you if you really want to, but it still won’t work.”

He then went on to say, “We will land on time.” I waited for the lie about making time up in the air, but instead this pilot said, “We’ve got three hours and 20 minutes allocated for flight time, but it only takes two hours, five minutes, so we’ll be fine.” It’s the first public acknowledgement I’ve ever heard of that.

Unfortunately, he did not explain the airlines’ obsession with peanuts. Some secrets just go too deep.

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home) and industrial water purification (biofilm removal).

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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SpiroFlo shares a quote from Carl Sagan on the value of earth.

It’s Earth Day. That day that’s important enough to show up pre-marked on my calendar, but still gets enough flak for, a) 24 hours not being good enough for such an important issue (when something like Mike the Headless Chicken gets a two-day annual festival); and b) that even promoting Earth Day—using physical materials for advertisements, power and energy for online promotion—can be criticized for doing the very things environmentalists want us to scale back.

Personally, I think it’s too easy to be a cynic without considering the positive merits. All you need is one more gripe and you never need to build anything. You just tear down the work of others. So if nothing else, Earth Day reminds me of Earth-related things I’ve appreciated along the way, including this quote from Carl Sagan:

http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.joeylombardi.com/blog/sagan.jpg&imgrefurl=http://blog.joeylombardi.com/2011/02/look-again-at-this-dot.html&h=678&w=500&sz=138&tbnid=5u_myLIEyHl7WM:&tbnh=90&tbnw=66&zoom=1&usg=__pSc4TcA-hOvtH3fCLfjOILJXN4Y=&docid=TS--gVEv5VhG2M&itg=1&sa=X&ei=UYR1UdjxFMfUqAHFtYC4DQ&ved=0CDsQ9QEwAw&dur=297

And the next part that usually gets left off in our “meme it down for me” (and include a picture of a cat) internet culture:

“It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home) and industrial water purification (biofilm removal).

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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SpiroFlo shares an infographic of the energy inefficiency of data centers.

We live in a wired world. It’s telecommunications everywhere, and that has to be backed up with contingencies and redundancies. As highlighted by the first half of the following infographic, all of that is a massive power drain—be it represented by a growing toaster army or meaningful location visual. The second half of this infographic—on how to make data centers greener—is more iffy, as solar and wind energy potential is often based on what people would like it to be (without problems, of course) rather that what it actually would be.

In the same way that the cell phone that fits in kids’ pockets today is more powerful that the computers that filled up rooms decades ago, there’s a lot of energy to conserve in this area:

data-center-energy-use-760

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home) and industrial water purification (biofilm removal).

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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