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Archive for February, 2013

Vortex Tools looks at a boring video interview on how Prius drivers create habits that make other drivers nuts, but nets them great gas mileage.  

By Tokumeigakarinoaoshima (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia CommonsWho’s up for a hokey interview?

Fox News recently posted an interview called “Confessions of an Annoying Prius Driver” – complete with a guy sitting in, yes, a Prius during the whole thing. He covers why Prius owners coast when coming to a stop, why they’re slow to accelerate, and how these easy-going driving habits can greatly increase your miles-per-gallon if you can avoid stressing the electric battery. If anything, the interview shows the aggressiveness of drivers around a Prius, not the annoying habits of Prius drivers themselves.

Straight up: It’s a snoozer of a video—a hook title with no payoff (thus this brief article is largely the same)—but there’s at least a whooshing graphic noise early on. Yay technology.

There you have it. I watch lousy videos so you don’t have to (but you’re on the internet, so you’ll probably find something fitting that description anyway).

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home) and industrial water purification (biofilm removal).

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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Is Global Warming Over?

Public domain: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Red_question_mark.svgSpiroFlo looks at the conflicting data between global warming reportedly ending 16 years ago and 2012 being the hottest year on record.

Last year, I covered an article that stated global warming ended 16 years ago, but that the study went widely unreported. Last month I noted that 2012 was the hottest year on record. So, um, which is it?

Well, first of all, that article on global warming ending has received several rebuttals (see here and here for starters). The key points:

  • On the short-term side of the argument, we’ve seen eight of the hottest years in the last decade.
  • Additionally, some of the people quoted in The Daily Mail article don’t like the way their words were spun (not surprising, given how all of them are climate change scientists that work for a research group whose financial backing is somewhat tied to their findings).
  • There are, of course, accusations of money skewing the findings/articles, but that’s sadly true for all sides of the debate.
  • Finally, the big criticism is that The Daily Mail cherry-picked their numbers from a shorter period to skew a different result: “Climate change can only be detected from multi-decadal timescales due to the inherent variability in the climate system. If you use a longer period from HadCRUT4 the trend looks very different. For example, 1979 to 2011 shows 0.16°C/decade (or 0.15°C/decade in the NCDC dataset, 0.16°C/decade in GISS). Looking at successive decades over this period, each decade was warmer than the previous — so the 1990s were warmer than the 1980s, and the 2000s were warmer than both.”

This call to look at a larger time frame can be problematic, as many global warming skeptics believe that long-term trends show that periods of heating and cooling are cyclical more than they are majorly affected by people, so then the real question becomes: just how long is long enough to get the results you want to see?

As mentioned previously, 2012 being the hottest year on record is actually a problem for global warming alarmists, as the next set of years—even if they’re hotter than what they should be—will actually show a cooling trend because of just how stinkin’ hot 2012 was. This is part of why the phrase ‘global warming’ is largely getting phased out in favor of ‘climate change.’ That said, getting opportunities to explain the cooler numbers vs. an overall warming trend will likely remain difficult when it comes to the skepticism of the Average Joe.

For now, we get some great reminders of how all sides can skew the numbers.

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home) and industrial water purification (biofilm removal).

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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SpiroFlo shares a British infographic on business electricity costs and ramifications.

For all that’s legitimate in this infographic, I have to pick on one statement: “Enough sunlight falls on the earth in one hour to power the entire world for a year!”

This is possible… if we could actually develop a solar panel that could capture, store and use that much energy. We’d also have to cover the whole earth in this amazing, not-yet-invented solar panel. This means no more oceans, no more landscapes. As for the Egyptian pyramids? Cover them with solar panels. The Statue of Liberty? Solar panel her (and replace that flame while you’re at it). The Great Wall of China, the Lighthouse of Alexandria, the Roman Coliseum? Panels, panels, panels!

While we’re at it, we might as well cover ourselves in full body solar panel outfits. If nothing else, we’ll be one step closer to looking like a Tron movie. In the meantime, it’s a good reminder of why solar could be so big:

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Colin McKay Miller is the VP of Marketing for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home) and industrial water purification (biofilm removal).

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

Read Full Post »