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Archive for February, 2012

SpiroFlo previews the current U.S. drought and the specifics that have affected Texas recently.

At the end of last year, we shared an image of the Texas drought. Since that time, the Lone Star state has hardly improved. The Winter 2012 issue of the SDWA (Safe Drinking Water Act) newsletter noted the following:

  • 90% of Texas is still in severe-to-exceptional drought conditions.
  • “From October 2010 to September 2011, Texas recorded its driest year since 1895.”
  • This three-year record-setting drought is set to go on for another one-to-three years. Thus far, it has depleted surface and groundwater supplies by 25 inches.
  • 60% of Texas drinking water utilities depend on groundwater, but it is at historic low levels.
  • As of January 31, 2012, Spicewood, TX is out of water. They are set to truck in water for the next six-to-eight months.

As for the rest of the U.S., there’s a U.S. drought monitor that gets updated every week. Here’s the last three months:


GIF of the last 12 weeks

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Colin McKay Miller is the Marketing Manager for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home) and industrial water purification (biofilm removal).

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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Ecotech Systems analyzes the terms that make up the environmental world—the cliché, the misunderstood, and the “don’t tell your mama” variety—and how they play in today’s society. Today’s buzzword didn’t mean much when Ecotech Systems first went in to business, yet it’s now left their name in a crowd all touting some term: ecotechnology.

“Back in 1990, no one knew what Ecotech meant. We got called Ekka-tech all the time.”

This is Alan Miller, President of Ecotechnology, Ltd. talking. He first joined Ecotech (short for ecological technologies) in 1990. “You know who the biggest, public green supporter was at the time? McDonald’s. They about changed the packaging industry overnight when they went with non-CFC cups and boxes.”

Granted, he admits, McDonald’s were forced into the change, as the grassroots McToxics campaign pressured them to move away from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) styrofoam packaging to what they use today. Back when the ozone layer was a common buzzword, CFCs were criticized for ozone depletion, so  when a national powerhouse like McDonald’s made the switch, other fast food companies soon followed.

“We believed that green was going to be huge. For the longest time, it seemed that green small businesses had no chance, but we thought this was changing — that ecological and economical did not have to be opposed anymore. So we went with Ecotechnology.”

Little did Ecotechnology, Ltd. know that the ecotech term was about to become popular in the 5-10 years following. “Ecotech didn’t mean anything to most people back then; same as green.” These days, Ecotech is tied to institutions and a number of green technologies. The terms “ecotech” and “green” still have little meaning today, although this is more due to the fact that businesses can shape them to mean whatever they want.

An Ecotech System on site

“Systems” was later added to the name to set Ecotechnology, Ltd. apart from all the other Ecotechs. Swimming against the tide in Google searches, the Ecotech system specializes in the cost-effective, nonthermal drying of biosolids (and a myriad of granular materials) by adding a low-grade heat (150 degrees F). These Ecotech systems can also move  and sort materials — soda ash, potash, crumb rubber, copper fines, sugar beets, etc. — with minimal degradation and pipe wear. The applications for moving potash are the number one selling application for the Ecotech system.

Using the patented EcoVeyor, the Ecotech system conveys over long-distances and through significant (even vertical) changes in elevation, no moving parts for minimal maintenance, positive environmental effects through its closed-loop design, and boosted value from lower product attrition and lower line wear for longer pipe life.

Maybe in another twenty years, the ecotech term will be unpopular again. Ecotechnology, Ltd. hopes to still sell systems then.

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Colin McKay Miller is the Marketing Manager for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home) and industrial water purification (biofilm removal).

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).

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Last week, SpiroFlo had a graphic on why you should care about water conservation. This time, we’re looking at what we recycle, what we throw away, and how long it’ll take for all of it to decompose:

So this means skinny people are less wasteful? Something like that, right?

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Colin McKay Miller is the Marketing Manager for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home) and industrial water purification (biofilm removal).

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, etc.) 

 

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Ecotech Systems discusses how their patented EcoVeyor non-thermally dries materials—including food products, copper fines and biosolids—all for about $1 a ton.

Last time we spoke about the patented Ecotech system, we talked about biosolids—a polarizing treatment process that blew up the comments section. This time, we’re addressing how the Ecotech system non-thermally dries material—yes, including biosolids (sorry, comments section, you’re going to get mauled by search term responses again)—at a rate the fraction of the cost of alternate methods.

That non-thermal drying part is pretty important, as thermal drying (basically adding a lot of heat along with a lot of associated energy costs) is incredibly expensive. For you engineering types, look at the latent heat of vaporization to see just how much energy is needed to dry water — we’re talking $250 a dry ton expensive. The standard non-thermal drying techniques include belt presses or centrifuges (basically big tanks with turbines to spin the material), co-composting and chemicals. Although they are often cheaper than thermal drying techniques—$85 to $180 a dry ton—they are often slower, leaving options that are either too expensive or too slow to be viable.

With this is mind, Ecotech brought the patented EcoVeyor drying system to market, combining just enough heat and motion to be highly efficient and cost-effective. Put it this way: Combining heat and motion works in your household (i.e. your clothes dryer)—it makes sense that the basic principle applies in larger, industrial applications. However, instead of spinning a whole chamber with moving parts that wear out, the EcoVeyor chamber sets up a stable, spiraling flow that moves and sorts materials—soda ash, potash, crumb rubber, copper fines, sugar beets, etc.—with minimal degradation and pipe wear. Since this type of spiraling flow is found all throughout nature, it’s no surprise that material continues to travel stably in this tornado-like flow.

Here’s the layout of a typical Ecotech system (click for a larger picture of those teeny labels):

Using the patented EcoVeyor, the Ecotech system has no moving parts for minimal maintenance, positive environmental effects through its closed-loop design, the ability to convey over long-distances and through significant (even vertical) changes in elevation, and boosted value from lower product attrition and lower line wear for longer pipe life.

Combining the EcoVeyor’s flow with a low-grade heat—150-degrees F: the type of heat usually easily available on-site of industrial applications—sheers off large amounts of moisture that atomizes in the pipe. Due to the combination of efficient flow and just enough heat, surface moisture is removed at a rapid rate for about $1 a ton. Although this EcoVeyor isn’t a complete drying solution, in removing up to 30 points of moisture (when starting with 25% solids), it’s a cost-effective intermediary step to any industrial drying application.

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Colin McKay Miller is the Marketing Manager for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home) and industrial water purification (biofilm removal).

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, etc.) and safe movement of materials (including potash and soda ash).


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Here’s why we work hard to promote residential hot water savings with the patented, cost-effective SpiroFlo device:

That beer and chocolate better be really good…

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Colin McKay Miller is the Marketing Manager for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home) and industrial water purification (biofilm removal).

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, etc.) 

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The Alternative Energy Shift forums have a growing list of 366 ways to live green. As of this date, they’re only ~15% of the way there, and most of the duh options are out the way already (#2: Recycle; #9: Insulate; #19: Reusable bags).

Here are a few of the more novel suggestions (even if the first one is more of a fact):

#20: If the label on your food has more than 3 ingredients, the rest is chemicals and fillers.

#29: Save a small bundle of old newspapers for window cleaning. Streak free, and better than wasting paper towels.

#31: Tablespoon or two of used coffee on house plants periodically; gives them a small boost, helps loosen compacted soil when it’s mixed in.

Come by and add your own suggestions. Maybe I’ll convince someone to dress up like Captain Planet.

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Colin McKay Miller is the Marketing Manager for the SpiroFlo Holdings group of companies:

SpiroFlo for residential hot water savings (delivered 35% faster with up to a 5% volume savings on every hot water outlet in the home) and industrial water purification (biofilm removal).

Vortex Tools for extending the life of oil and gas wells (recovering up to 10 times more NGLs, reducing flowback startup times, replacing VRUs, eliminating paraffin and freezing in winter, etc.).

Ecotech for cost-effective non-thermal drying (for biosolids, sugar beets, etc.) 

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